Phu Quoc National Park, Phu Quoc Island

(3.2/5 based on 100+ reviews on the web)
Feel the atmosphere of pure nature at Phu Quoc National Park. Covering over a half of the island, the park stretches over an area of approximately 32 ha (80 ac) including sea and land areas. Run away from the heat and take a stroll on the park trails to breathe the fresh air at one of the Unesco biosphere reserves. Adventurers will find their share of adrenaline on the north part of the park which has dirt roads perfect for motor biking. Bring plenty water as the temperatures can get high during daytime. See Phu Quoc National Park and all Phu Quoc Island has to offer by arranging your trip with our Phu Quoc Island trip itinerary planner.
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14 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM INDIA June, outdoors, romantic, beaches, hidden gems PREFERENCES: June, outdoors, romantic, beaches ATTRACTION STYLE: Hidden gems PACE: Medium 25 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM CANADA January, culture, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: January, culture, relaxing, beaches, historic sites ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 13 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM UNITED KINGDOM December, culture, outdoors, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, popular PREFERENCES: December, culture, outdoors, relaxing, beaches, historic sites ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 60 days in Asia BY A USER FROM NETHERLANDS August, culture, outdoors, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, museums, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: August, culture, outdoors, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, museums ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 57 days in Southeast Asia BY A USER FROM CANADA March, culture, outdoors, beaches, historic sites, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: March, culture, outdoors, beaches, historic sites ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 33 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM MALAYSIA October, culture, beaches, historic sites, hidden gems PREFERENCES: October, culture, beaches, historic sites ATTRACTION STYLE: Hidden gems PACE: Medium 17 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM SWITZERLAND August, culture, outdoors, relaxing, romantic, beaches, historic sites, shopping, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: August, culture, outdoors, relaxing, romantic, beaches, historic sites, shopping ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 17 days in Vietnam & Thailand BY A USER FROM SWITZERLAND August, culture, outdoors, relaxing, romantic, beaches, historic sites, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: August, culture, outdoors, relaxing, romantic, beaches, historic sites ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 24 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM NEW ZEALAND June, culture, outdoors, relaxing, romantic, beaches, historic sites, museums, shopping, hidden gems PREFERENCES: June, culture, outdoors, relaxing, romantic, beaches, historic sites, museums, shopping ATTRACTION STYLE: Hidden gems PACE: Medium 32 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM NEW ZEALAND July, outdoors, relaxing, beaches, fast-paced, hidden gems PREFERENCES: July, outdoors, relaxing, beaches ATTRACTION STYLE: Hidden gems PACE: Fast-paced 11 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM PORTUGAL November, culture, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, hidden gems PREFERENCES: November, culture, relaxing, beaches, historic sites ATTRACTION STYLE: Hidden gems PACE: Medium 21 days in Laos, Cambodia & Vietnam BY A USER FROM ITALY August, culture, outdoors, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, museums, hidden gems PREFERENCES: August, culture, outdoors, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, museums ATTRACTION STYLE: Hidden gems PACE: Medium
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Reviews
TripAdvisor
  • Nice nature scene, but could be better if they took care of it more. Easy to get lost as the signs are not very instructive.  more »
  • Unfortunately nobody take care of this national park. I have rented motorbike and did quite long tour through the park, some small paths. I didn't see any animals, just a lot of locals devastating par...  more »
  • We rendered by taxi. The sea side edge are massacred by the huge building of hotels under construction. We sum entered the jungle through a trail joncher of waste. In short, a little disappointed.
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Google
  • Superb quality reservation. Not recommend for people afraid of the wilderness. Not even a tourist site after all.
  • Koh Tral Khmer, disappointedly gave always.
  • The popular Khmer view of Koh Tral – as reflected in the Khmer blogosphere, in popular song, and on YouTube travelogues – is that the island which Vietnamese know as Phu Quoc is historically Khmer, that Cambodia has never relinquished its territorial claim, that Koh Tral was unfairly awarded the Vietnamese in 1954 over Cambodian protest, and that because the maritime border used a 1939 French colonial administrative line never intended to reflect sovereignty (the “Brevie Line”) international law should dictate the island’s return to Cambodia.This view and the quest by leading Khmer politicians to secure Phu Quoc for Cambodia appears rooted in myth. It reflects a misunderstanding of the history of the island and the Khmer’s connection to it, an exaggeration of Khmer leaders’ continuing commitment to the cause of Koh Tral, and a lack of appreciation of the legal hurdles involved in wresting the territory from Vietnam in courts of international law. It is a common refrain among Cambodia’s opposition movement, as currently embodied in the Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), and particularly popular with party leader Sam Rainsy to “remember the sad fate of Kampuchea Krom,” or that chunk of southern Vietnam that was once part of the Khmer kingdom. The prevailing admonition regarding Kampuchea Krom in general may reflect resignation, but such is not the case with Koh Tral. CNRP party leaders Kem Sokha and Sam Rainsy have committed themselves and their party to seek recovery of the island to Cambodia by legal means, citing international law as favoring such a return. But both the historical record and the legal avenues that would have to be pursued to secure Koh Tral’s return to Cambodia differ quite substantially from the popular view.A Khmer Island? While Cambodia certainly laid early claim to the island, no one has offered compelling evidence that Khmers have ever had a substantial modern presence there, or that a Cambodian state exercised authority during a time of Khmer occupation. For many Khmers the case of Koh Tral is one of history imagined rather than remembered. Artifacts in the Heritage Museum at Phu Quoc evidence human habitation going back 2,500 years, long before a Khmer nation existed. Pottery there from what the Vietnamese refer to as the Oc Eo period (1st -7th century AD) suggests at least a proto-Khmer presence on the island during a period preceding the establishment of the Angkorian empire. The earliest Cambodian references to Koh Tral are found in royal documents dated 1615, reflecting the allocation of the various governors’ authorities among the territories of the Khmer empire. We don’t know how many Khmer inhabitants the island may have had, nor do we know how the Khmer sovereign’s authority was reflected in the life of the hardy souls who may have been resident. It must be recalled that this was a chaotic period for the Cambodian state; no fewer than 15 kings occupied the throne during the 17th century.Around 1680, one of these kings granted Chinese merchant and explorer Mac Cuu the authority to settle and develop a large swath of unproductive Cambodian coast, a project that resulted in Mac Cuu’s establishing Ha Tien and six other villages as trading centers newly populated by fellow Chinese immigrants and Portuguese traders, including one village on Phu Quoc. With Vietnam and Cambodia besieged by Thai invaders in a struggle for regional dominance fought mostly on Cambodian soil, by 1714 Mac Cuu had changed allegiance and recognized the authority of the Vietnamese sovereign. In return Mac Cuu’s family gained the right to oversee his lands as a fiefdom, paying tribute to the Nguyen lords who ruled southern Vietnam.
  • We went there 2010.I don't think there is enough to go back again. It was very dusty on the roads and perhaps the island has more paved roads.
  • good place