The Independence Palace, Ho Chi Minh City

Captured in the historic 1975 photograph of a North Vietnamese military tank crashing through its gates, The Independence Palace played a pivotal role in the fall of Saigon and the end of the Vietnam War. The interior of the palace has remained nearly intact since it was built as a residence of the South Vietnamese president in 1966. Its desolate halls and rooms are time capsules, displaying period-style furnishings and motifs--conference rooms, reception halls, a war room, a telecommunication center, and tunnels in the basement. Check out the president's living quarters, featuring bizarre decorations, such as actual elephant feet. At the entrance you can see a Vietnamese T-54 tank and the roof is topped with a model of a presidential helicopter. Plan to visit The Independence Palace during your Ho Chi Minh City vacation using our convenient Ho Chi Minh City trip planner .
Create an itinerary including The Independence Palace
map
The Independence Palace Tours
View more tours
Places to stay near The Independence Palace
The Independence Palace Reviews
Rate this attraction
TripAdvisor Traveler Rating
TripAdvisor Traveler Rating 3.5
8,298 reviews
Google
4.4
TripAdvisor
  • Interesting to see the building and read its history , great views of the city from the roof. Worth visiting .  more »
  • Visited here on our last day - everything seems to have been preserved from the last president of south Vietnam before his surrender. You can see how him and his family lived throughout this war and v...  more »
  • The palace has no interesting history. It is a modern imitation of old-time europian palaces, a bit pathetic. Not clear why they need it, apart from glorifying the present regime.  more »
Google
  • A groovy, well preserved example of high 1960’s architecture, this 92 room palace was in use by the president of South Vietnam for less than a decade before the fall of Saigon to the communists. It’s mostly as it was back in the 60s, with very neat period furniture and decor. There’s less sheer propaganda here than in other war-era museums, too and tickets are reasonable. Do be aware that they close for lunch, so either go in the morning or afternoon. One star taken off because navigating the complex is confusing and sometimes poorly marked, and the huge central space age looking staircase is closed, so you have to go all the way to the sides for the other stairs - but there’s no sign telling visitors this. Don’t miss the bunker complex underground, or the Huey helicopter on the roof landing pad. Well worth a few hours of your time and a few dollars.
  • Then they filed back to the farm buildings and halted in silence outside the door of the farmhouse. That was theirs too, but they were frightened to go inside. After a moment, however, Snowball and Napoleon butted the door open with their shoulders and the animals entered in single file, walking with the utmost care for fear of disturbing anything. They tiptoed from room to room, afraid to speak above a whisper and gazing with a kind of awe at the unbelievable luxury, at the beds with their feather mattresses, the looking−glasses, the horsehair sofa, the Brussels carpet, the lithograph of Queen Victoria over the drawing−room mantelpiece. They were just coming down the stairs when Mollie was discovered to be missing. Going back, the others found that she had remained behind in the best bedroom. She had taken a piece of blue ribbon from Mrs. Jones's dressing−table, and was holding it against her shoulder and admiring herself in the glass in a very foolish manner. The others reproached her sharply, and they went outside. Some hams hanging in the kitchen were taken out for burial, and the barrel of beer in the scullery was stove in with a kick from Boxer's hoof, − otherwise nothing in the house was touched. A unanimous resolution was passed on the spot that the farmhouse should be preserved as a museum. All were agreed that no animal must ever live there.  George Orwell, Animal Farm. 1945
  • It was like going in a time machine and landing in the 60s. Some interesting decor and architecture. the bunker was quite interesting. Layout was a bit confusing though. Protip: Make sure you don't take shortcuts or you might ended up going against the flow of people.
  • This is a must see place for those interested in recent political history. The former South Vietnam presidential palace is now turned into a museum. In addition to an interesting story of America's attempt at modernizing a foreign land, it is a wonderful architectural statement in the international style that symbolizes some of the idealism of the early to mid 60s. As with Afganistan, ultimately the United State's inability to stem the rampant corruption of their allied regime let to it's eventual fall to the relatively clean North. To now see the city rise well beyond what that earlier regime failed to deliver is a true testament to human endeavor.
  • So interesting to see how the rooms looked in the 70s and it's definitely worth the money to visit. I would advise visitors to refer to the floor plan on the wall on the right hand side when you enter the palace. Although there are arrows to guide you, they aren't always clear and we were about to leave until we noticed that we'd missed the bunker, top floor and roof which should definitely be seen!

Plan your trip to Ho Chi Minh City

  • Get a personalized plan

    A complete day-by-day itinerary
    based on your preferences
  • Customize it

    Refine your plan. We'll find the
    best routes and schedules
  • Book it

    Choose from the best hotels
    and activities. Up to 50% off
  • Manage it

    Everything in one place.
    Everyone on the same page.

Plans to The Independence Palace by other users

8 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM SPAIN August, popular PREFERENCES: August ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 9 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM UNITED KINGDOM December, popular PREFERENCES: December ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 10 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM VIETNAM April, popular PREFERENCES: April ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 22 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM SLOVENIA October, popular PREFERENCES: October ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 27 days in Vietnam, Thailand & Siem Reap BY A USER FROM CANADA September, culture, outdoors, relaxing, romantic, beaches, historic sites, museums, shopping, wildlife, slow & easy, popular PREFERENCES: September, culture, outdoors, relaxing, romantic, beaches, historic sites, museums, shopping, wildlife ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Slow & easy 15 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM SWITZERLAND October, culture, outdoors, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, museums, wildlife, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: October, culture, outdoors, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, museums, wildlife ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 19 days in Thailand, Vietnam & Siem Reap BY A USER FROM UNITED STATES May, popular PREFERENCES: May ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 16 days in Vietnam & Laos BY A USER FROM SLOVENIA September, popular PREFERENCES: September ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 26 days in Asia BY A USER FROM SLOVENIA June, popular PREFERENCES: June ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 41 days in Vietnam BY A USER FROM VIETNAM June, culture, relaxing, beaches, historic sites, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: June, culture, relaxing, beaches, historic sites ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 29 days in Southeast Asia BY A USER FROM BRAZIL February, fast-paced, popular PREFERENCES: February ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Fast-paced 3 days in Ho Chi Minh City BY A USER FROM EGYPT May, popular PREFERENCES: May ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium
View more plans