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Thomas Edison National Historical Park, West Orange

4.7
Historic Site · Park
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Thomas Edison National Historical Park preserves Thomas Edison's laboratory and residence, Glenmont, in West Orange, New Jersey, United States. These were designed, in 1887, by architect Henry Hudson Holly. The Edison laboratories operated for more than 40 years. Out of the West Orange laboratories came the motion picture camera, improved phonographs, sound recordings, silent and sound movies and the nickel-iron alkaline electric storage battery.

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Thomas Edison National Historical Park reviews

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TripAdvisor traveler rating
TripAdvisor traveler rating 4.5
490 reviews
Google
4.7
TripAdvisor
  • You can easily forget all that Edison invented or improved 100 years ago that still make our daily lives easier today. Definitely worth the trip if you are nearby and have a few hours to spare... 
    You can easily forget all that Edison invented or improved 100 years ago that still make our daily lives easier today. Definitely worth the trip if you are nearby and have a few hours to spare...  more »
  • This museum is a hidden gem. Well worth the time. Get the audio tour. Make a reservation to go to Edison's home as well- The Glenmore Estate - which is just down the road. My only criticism is... 
    This museum is a hidden gem. Well worth the time. Get the audio tour. Make a reservation to go to Edison's home as well- The Glenmore Estate - which is just down the road. My only criticism is...  more »
  • As with all NPS websites, this one is confusing. Glenmont, the Thomas Edison house, is a separate ticket from the laboratory, and you need to purchase that ticket separately. However, you have to... 
    As with all NPS websites, this one is confusing. Glenmont, the Thomas Edison house, is a separate ticket from the laboratory, and you need to purchase that ticket separately. However, you have to...  more »
Google
  • This was an interesting experience! Walking through the various labs makes you appreciate the trial and error involved with invention.. street is great with great stories. Don't forget to check out the house too
  • This place is great! All three floors were open to walk around in. The rangers are all super helpful and I feel like I learned a lot about Edison. Although you can’t go in the house, you can walk around the outside. Edison’s grave is there as well as some deer. The whole place is awesome and a nice change from the abysmal New Jersey turnpike. I would love to return once the park fixes the machinery inside. (The ranger said it works, just needs a bit of refurbishment).
  • I am giving this place a 1 star rating because of the rude old caucasian guy who unfortunately is even a Park Ranger. If you are reading this you know who you are. Me and my cousin were so excited to finally come here so we can tick it off of our National Parks lists. We collect passport stamps as well as a souvenir from all of our visits. This unbelievably rude park ranger walked up to me and took the Junior Ranger stamp and said “this is a Junior Ranger stamp, when you become a Junior Ranger you can use it”. I was left speechless by this callous display of attitude, from a Ranger no less. He didn’t even asked if i was getting it for my kid or a niece/nephew. He saw 2 non-white women and decided hey they’re not kids they can’t get this stamp. What a petty thing to do! Philadelphia had 11 stamps tucked away in 1 corner and you were free to stamp away, same with the Boston sites and the PNW ones. They had 2 and this old guy seems to be guarding them with his life. We have gone to 25+ National Parks and this is the first time a Park Ranger has been rude to us ever! He ruined our entire visit because of his bad attitude right at the beginning of our visit. We will never go back here again and would not suggest to family and friends to come either. Maybe it’s time you retired, you don’t seem to be happy with your job anymore. You are in the business of customer service and your attitude is garbage. This place charges entrance fees and we even have the annual pass which means we are legit National Parks Travellers. You seem to have forgotten that your salary relies on the visitors who come and yet you decide to be rude to.
  • This is a very nice national landmark. It provides a complete look at Edison’s genius and how the scientists actually worked, made prototypes, tested, it’s a comprehensive look at not only Edison but also that time in history. The rangers were friendly and helpful, the location is easy to wander around. Be sure to visit Edison’s house, the grounds are nice and quiet.
  • What a great historical park! The Thomas Edison National Historical Park is divided into two different parts at two different locations. The first park is Edison's "invention factory" at Menlo Park. Here you can see the places that Edison and his employees worked to develop some of the greatest inventions in all of history. The main factory building contains a library that Edison used for research, a music room that Edison worked to develop the phonograph in, a drawing room, and a film room (kinetograph). The factory work floors showcase many of Edison's inventions. Machines that Edison and his employees used are left fully intact for all to see. Mostly everything presented are historic originals. Across the way from the main factory building is the Chemistry Lab where Edison worked with employees. Again, original equipment is left fully intact in this lab. It was here that Edison created the practical storage battery. Finally, the main campus contains the Visitor Center with a gift shop. You can also watch a film about Edison in this part of the park. Park rangers and volunteers were friendly and helpful. The second part of the park is Edison's house called Glenmont. To go to Glenmont you should reserve a ticket ahead of time through the park website. You will have to drive into a neighborhood a little less than a mile away from the Menlo Park laboratory. The house is a spectacular Gilded Age mansion where Edison, his second wife, and kids lived. The house is located in the first planned community in the US. Although a different owner built the house under suspicious circumstances Edison bought the house and expanded it. All decorations and furniture are original to the house. Perhaps, the house library is most interesting in that none of the books in the house were ever even opened or used. Edison's garage is one of a kind featuring not only a Model T, but some early electric cars from the 1900's. A greenhouse is also on the property. In the back of the house is where Edison and his wife are buried. Make sure to go to both places if visiting the park. It is hard to find a better museum of historical importance anywhere.

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