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Navajo National Monument, Tonalea

(170 reviews on the web)
Ruin
Navajo National Monument is located in Tonalea. Plan to visit Navajo National Monument during your Tonalea vacation using our convenient Tonalea trip itinerary builder.
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Reviews
TripAdvisor
  • This is a short drive off hwy 160 and is definitely worth it. 1.3 mile round trip hike, all paved to see the cliff dwellings of multiple tribes of native peoples. It has a small museum and video to wa...  more »
  • The Navajo National Monument is more than a little off the beaten trail. For this reason, it is not troubled with crowds and can be enjoyed in its unspoiled state. With only a short amount of walking ...  more »
  • We first visited Navajo Nat'l Mon 30 years ago. Its a gorgeous place with its smaller canyons lined with juniper. Back then, we hiked the trail to Keet Seel ruins - we were not disappointed in the wal...  more »
Google
  • If you are fit, take one of the morning hikes to Betatakin House. Almost original never restored cliff house. But its a 3 mile hike with a 1000 ft drop and then hike back out. But the trail alone is stunning.
  • Can't beat free RV sites at beautiful location. Great Anasazi ruins and excellent video.
  • Navajo National Monument is in the middle the Navajoland, but its ancient structures and ruins were created by the Anasazi, who predated the Navajo by many centuries. Today, the monument is a great place to get off the highway and visit the interpretive center or camp at Sunset Campground. The campground accommodates tent campers and smaller RVs or travel trailers. The maximum length allowed in the campground is twenty-eight feet. Camping is free! Water is available, but there is no RV dumpsite. There is mobile telephone coverage, but 4G data is spotty at best. Developed in the mid 1960s, the campground has a single loop road and is generally very quiet. The elevation is over 7000 feet, so it can be cold at night any time of year.
  • Beautiful valley but poorly managed. Dirt roads and parts are near washed out so make sure you have a high clearance vehicle of you are driving in. We arrived minutes after it opened but the only thing open and ready was the first gate. Everything else was slowly opened over the next two hours, including the second hate into the valley. I paid so drive around it when I couldn't find any help, or anyone for that matter, to provide assistance.
  • Cool, free park. It was interesting seeing some old pueblan cliff dwellings and the information on the walk of the plants and the way they were used.