The Stephen Hopkins House, Providence

4.7
#5 of 9 in Historic Sites in Providence
Historic Site · Hidden Gem · Tourist Spot
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The Governor Stephen Hopkins House is a museum and National Historic Landmark at 15 Hopkins Street in Providence, Rhode Island. The house was the home of Stephen Hopkins, a governor of Rhode Island and signatory of the Declaration of Independence.
The Stephen Hopkins House is an L-shaped, 2½-story, wood-framed structure whose main block was built in 1742–43 for Hopkins, with an attached two-story ell whose first floor dates to 1707. The main block is four bays wide and two deep, with the main entrance in the second bay from the left. This entry is a 20th-century alteration; the original main entrance was through a doorway on the west side of the ell.
The interior of the main block has the main parlor on the right and Governor Hopkins' study on the left, flanking a central hallway with stair. Behind the parlor is a keeping room, with a small bedchamber behind the study. There are five bedrooms on the second floor, two with fireplaces. The downstairs fireplace mantels are paneled, with the one in the parlor slightly more elaborate.
The 1707 house was purchased by Stephen Hopkins in 1742 and enlarged into its present size. It served as his home until his death in 1785. During these years, he served in the colonial assembly, as a justice (first associate, then chief) of the colonial high court, and as governor of the Colony of Rhode Island from 1755 to 1757. The house is the only significant structure associated with Hopkins' life.
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The Stephen Hopkins House reviews

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TripAdvisor traveler rating 5.0
116 reviews
Google
4.8
TripAdvisor
  • We were greatly disappointed to make the trek to this historic location to tour it during the hours the website said it was open. It was not open at that time. While we were outside taking pictures....  more
    We were greatly disappointed to make the trek to this historic location to tour it during the hours the website said it was open. It was not open at that time. While we were outside taking pictures....  more »
  • This is an easy house to miss. In fact I walked past it several times not realizing its significance. There is a nice garden outside and some good views of downtown. 
    This is an easy house to miss. In fact I walked past it several times not realizing its significance. There is a nice garden outside and some good views of downtown.  more »
  • Stephen Hopkins was the founding father and governor of Rhode Island and signatory of the Declaration of Independence. George Washington had stayed at this house. Their are many gorgeous artifacts... 
    Stephen Hopkins was the founding father and governor of Rhode Island and signatory of the Declaration of Independence. George Washington had stayed at this house. Their are many gorgeous artifacts...  more »
Google
  • I would like to start my review with the tourist guide who actually invited us to visit this place. So, we were roaming around and guide asked us to take a look into that place and history related to it. Since i was visiting from Canada, i had no clue who Stephen Hopkins was but after the tour, I actually read a lot about him and his life experience. This house is a great place to visit if you’re interested to see how people used to live in colonial society. Everything related to Stephen Hopkins is still placed in that house and history is very interesting.
  • This is a great place to visit. So much history. Our guide was very knowledgeable. There is no cost to tour the place but they do ask for donations. This house is over 300 years old.
  • Y'know...I've been to my share of museums, and the long and short of it is this: 1) The less crowded, the better 2) The more hands on, the better 3) The guide, if afforded the opportunity to have one, makes or breaks the whole thing. We got here at 10am (opening) on a scorching hot Saturday, and we were joined by only one other intrepid scholar. Check one in our museum-fun favor. Marjorie (the guide) took us right in. She kept apologizing for the heat, but her warmth and her candor was way more overwhelming. She is a gem and we had a delightful time learning about early Providence. Oh, and she let us carry the water pot...bro, we are PAMPERED with our plumbing and innoculations. Of note: I'm impressed with both this house and John Brown's house up the street for their willingness to engage with the stain of slavery head on in both exhibits. For any nerds like me and my lady out there, this is a fine hour spent in RI. Oh, and it's freaking FREE, so leave a good tip and sign the guestbook... otherwise, the grants stop coming in....sigh.
  • Very interesting history. Friendly and helpful staff made the visit edifying.
  • Currently closed due to covid, which unfortunately wasn't indicated on their website, but it was still worth seeing from the outside and walking around the flower garden etc. Beautiful area near Brown University campus. Maintained very well. Would love to see inside the house at some point. Note it may be difficult to find a parking spot.

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