Trip Planner:   USA  /  California  /  Long Beach  /  Parks  /  Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden
Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden, Long Beach
(4.6/5 based on 110 reviews on the web)
The Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden is a Japanese garden encompassing 1.3acre on the campus of California State University, Long Beach, in Long Beach, California, USA. It was dedicated in 1981. Ed Lovell, landscape master plan architect for the University, traveled to Japan and took inspiration from the Imperial Gardens in Tokyo before designing the garden. Among the annual events held at the Japanese garden is a Koi auction and a chrysanthemum show.The garden is closed on Saturdays (when it is often rented out for weddings and receptions) and Mondays.
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Reviews
TripAdvisor
  • For a quick stop on the way to Los Almaritos Rancho, long beach a must see historical location! What it was like before california was california. Beautiful gardens, Adobe house and shire horses! One ...  more »
  • It is a $5 entrance fee. Beautiful landscape. However, the smell of the water in the pond is not good. 
  • This is a nice place to come to if you want to see Japanese gardens look without going to Japan . The scenery is beautiful and it is very peaceful. It's also free to enter 
Google
  • A beautiful little Japanese garden tucked away on CSULB's campus. It's a nice place to come take a short walk, sit, and enjoy the abiance. Feeding the koi fish is lots of fun - it's 50 cents for a big handful of food and the fish all flock over to you. It's also a cute place for an afternoon date!
  • Very quiet environment. You can feed the koi fish by paying 50¢ at a dispenser. There's tables and benches to sit and have a chat. Usually there are people from all over (tourists,locals,students) but professional photography is not allowed (tripods, etc) which allows for a more immersive experience. Definitely enjoyed visiting.
  • It's beautiful! It's a small Japanese Garden, but still amazing nonetheless. It has a Zen garden, lush vegetation throughout, and coy fish in the water lily - decorated pond. There's also a bridge that goes over the pond and seating areas throughout. Great place to relax and study, or just enjoy the view.
  • Japanese gardens have been around for centuries. They have been, and continue to be the source of inspiration for poets, writers, painters, sculptors and the general public. The Japanese garden is closely linked to the Japanese tea ceremony. Their idea is to awaken the spirit to the realization of our humility in our relationship with the world and the universe around us. It emphasizes the connection between the body’s movements and the mind. It was during the Heian period (794-1185) that gardens came to be viewed in this way. They separated from a solely religious purpose and began to include more secular motives such as the tea ceremony, amusement, contemplation and recreation. The Japanese garden takes several forms. The one most recognizable to me is the one which includes guided paths and water features that serve to guide a visitor. There are also dry gardens where racked sand is used to represent ripples on the surface of water. A typical garden has a center, or viewing point. This is usually a home or a place where tea ceremonies are held with a purposeful view of the garden. A typical list of some possible features in a Japanese garden might contain:  Water, whether real or symbolized.  A bridge spanning the water or stepping stones to allow crossing the water feature.  A hedge, fence or a wall.  A central viewing point or pavilion. The hedge feature is used to block out an unwanted view or to use some distant feature, such as a mountain, visible above the hedge, implying it is part of the garden by design. This adds to the sense of enclosure and vastness at the same time. I visited the Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden located at Cal State Long Beach. This public garden, unlike private ones, includes a wide variety of environments. The most obvious is the pond you come upon when you enter. It contains islands, water plants and rock features. It is crossed by an arching bridge and Koi, orange and white in an almost Pinto pattern, swim in large schools. The paths winds in and out of several different settings, each designed to set a different mood. A one point the path was broken and I had to look down and watch my footing. When I looked up again I saw a stand of bamboo partially concealing a small waterfall. I later learned the broken path was intended by design to take my eyes off the surroundings so that I could be rewarded by the water feature when I looked up again. It worked, I felt rewarded. Maybe not in that exact wording but I did feel suddenly glad I was there.
  • Loved it! Beautiful place and the koi fishes are just majestic creatures! Free admission and only $.50 to feed the kois. Great place to visit.