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Fort Hays State Historic Site, Hays
(4.1/5 based on 55+ reviews on the web)
Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Sergeant John Denny served at Fort Hays from January 1882 to December 1884. He and other African American “Buffalo Soldiers” are part of the rich Fort Hays history that includes names like Generals George A. Custer, Nelson Miles, and Philip Sheridan; Major Marcus Reno; William “Buffalo Bill” Cody; and James B. “Wild Bill” Hickok. Established in 1865 in the land of the Cheyenne and Arapaho, the fort protected railroad workers and travelers on the Smoky Hill Trail. See the soldiers’ clothing, weapons, and personal items, including George Custer’s dumbbell forged by the fort’s blacksmith. Learn more about the soldiers and the people they were protecting when you visit Fort Hays.

Admission:

Adults: $5

Students: $1

Children 5 & Under and Members of "Friends of the Fort": FREE
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Reviews
TripAdvisor
  • Located about two miles from I-70 and across from a small buffalo herd, this is worth a stop if you’re interested in Western U.S. history. Gen. Custer, Buffalo Bill, and Wild Bill Hickock have all pas...  more »
  • I was visiting family in Hays and they along with me had never visited the fort. I thought it would be great for two young men to learn about the history. The buildings have been kept up nicely and th...  more »
  • I never knew how the frontier and forts part of Kansas history were so entwined with the early settlement part of Kansas history. I was surprised to learn that the fort was still in operation when the...  more »
Google
  • ...Jumping off point into the West. Trains stopped here in late 1800's. "Dances with Wolves" began here.
  • A very large let down. I came here with high expectations of seeing the history of Hays. What I got was an uninterested employee and a few very plain buildings that are in desperate need of repairs.
  • Fun