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Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore

Categories: Cemeteries, Tourist Spots
Inspirock Rating:
3.5/5 based on 25+ reviews on the web
Green Mount Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. Established on March 15, 1838, and dedicated on July 13, 1839, it is noted for the large number of historical figures interred in its grounds as well as a large number of prominent Baltimore-area families. It retained the name Green Mount when the land was purchased from the heirs of Baltimore merchant Robert Oliver. Green Mount is a treasury of precious works of art, including striking works by major sculptors including William H. Rinehart and Hans Schuler.The cemetery was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. Guided tours are available at various times of the year.A Baltimore City Landmark plaque at the entrance reads:"Green Mount Cemetery was dedicated in 1839 on the site of the former country estate of Robert Oliver. This was at the beginning of the 'rural cemetery movement'; Green Mount was Baltimore's first such rural cemetery and one of the first in the U.S. The movement began both as a response to the health hazard posed by overcrowded church graveyards, and as part of the larger Romantic movement of the mid-1800s, which glorified nature and appealed to emotions. Green Mount reflects the romanticism of its age, not only by its very existence, but also by its buildings and sculpture. The gateway, designed by Robert Cary Long, Jr., and the hilltop chapel, designed by J. Rudolph Niernsee and J. Crawford Neilson, are Gothic Revival, a romantic style recalling medieval buildings remote in time. Nearly 65,000 people are buried here, including the poet Sydney Lanier, philanthropists Johns Hopkins and Enoch Pratt, Napoleon Bonaparte's sister-in-law Betsy Patterson, John Wilkes Booth, and numerous military, political and business leaders."'' In addition to John Wilkes Booth, two other conspirators in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln are buried here, Samuel Arnold and Michael O'Laughlen. It is common for visitors to the cemetery to leave pennies on the graves of the three men; the one-cent coin features the likeness of the president they successfully sought to murder.
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  • I'm not sure why people are going on and on about the neighborhood. It's fine. It's a city. The reviews had me nervous but honestly, it's fine. I went with my 13 year old godson who is a huge Lincoln ...  read more »
  • A beautiful green oasis in the busy city. You can see beautiful bronze sculptures here, too. But beyond all that is the amazing history. Names that a famous all over Baltimore can be found here, inclu...  read more »
  • The 4 original philanthropists of Baltimore, Elizabeth Garrett, Johns Hopkins, Johns Wilkes Booth, and more. Walking here is taking a walk thought Baltimore history! 
  • Very cool place. But please be mindful of where you are. The area is improving but still bordering some nasty, abandoned neighborhoods.
  • FFb. Abdul. Cheshire. Dysfunctional
  • Great history. Wortha trip if you were a history or maybe English major and enjoy the unusual.
  • I can't speak to if Green Mount has a Crematorium (a place where cremation happen) or not. So for the purpose of this review i am sticking to the cemetery. And in that aspect i am not talking about the services offered, to a point. Green Mount (or sometimes Greenmount) represents probably the most historic and well-known of the cemeteries in Baltimore. However if you're a fan of history, statuary and monuments, or just a fan of cemeteries in general, i highly recommend you check it out. One of the first things you might notice, after passing through the fortress like gates (of which one of the turrets, the one on the right as you enter, contains the offices where you can sign in, ask some question, drop off genealogy paperwork, and get a map), and for now discounting the gravesites is how hilly this cemetery is for such a small piece of ground. Parts of the Cemetery easily rise about the walls of it. This gives you an idea of what the surrounding area was like when the cemetery was founded in what was then the outskirts of the city (as opposed to it's almost central location now). The surrounding neighborhoods have been smoothed out as they were developed. So i would recommend good sneakers if you're traversing the cemetery on foot. As for statuary and monuments, in my opinion, Green Mount represents some of the best representation of American Memorialization of the Dead from the mid 1800's on to today. And unlike many modern cemeteries, even-though for all practical purposes it's full, the burials that still take place are not just restricted to a memorial plaque sat in the ground. But it is impressive to see the various different ways that families took to marking the plots of their deceased. As for history, more so then probably any other cemetery outside Westminster Burial Grounds for Baltimore. The most notable is John Wilkes Booth (not related) who is "supposedly" interred in family plot in an "unmarked" grave. Some notable others interred in the cemetery include, Johns Hopkins, Elizabeth "Betsy" Patterson-Bonaparte, Walter Lord, Allan Dulles, William Henry Rinehart, Enoch Pratt, and Sidney Lanier. Also don't be suppressed if you recognize Family names from the names of communities, streets, and points of interest around town. Do note that the cemetery closes earlier them most, around three i believe. And i don't believe it is open on Sundays (i could be wrong). They do offer tours. Personally i have yet to take one, but if you contact them they should give you information. With that said some advice about the neighborhood. While the cemetery is relatively safe (i've never had any issues) the surrounding neighborhood is less so. Over the years this has been one of the rougher neighborhoods in the city. While it has improved over the last couple of years, wandering around or exploring the adjacent neighborhood would not be recommended. Particularly if your alone, in a small group, or not familiar with the area. Their isn't much to see either and facilities are limited.
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