11 days in Southern Italy, Catania & Palermo Itinerary

11 days in Southern Italy, Catania & Palermo Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Italy holiday planner

Make it your trip
Drive
1
Sorrento
— 2 nights
Drive
2
Salerno
— 1 night
Fly
3
Catania
— 2 nights
Bus
4
Palermo
— 2 nights
Fly
5
Naples
— 3 nights

S M T W T F S
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
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15

Sorrento

— 2 nights

Land of the Sirens

A lovely town easily accessible from almost anywhere in the country, Sorrento overlooks the Bay of Naples and sits right on the Amalfi Drive.
Start off your visit on the 2nd (Sun): admire the verdant scenery at Il Vallone dei Mulini, then take in the spiritual surroundings of St Francis Church and Convent, then contemplate the waterfront views at Marina di Puolo, and finally do a tasting at Limonoro. On the 3rd (Mon), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: look for gifts at Augusto & Luca's Workshop, get engrossed in the history at Museobottega della Tarsialignea, take in the waterfront at Marina Grande - Antico Borgo Marinaro, then admire the striking features of Basilica di Sant'Antonino, and finally make a trip to Piazza Tasso.

To find reviews, where to stay, more things to do, and more tourist information, read our Sorrento trip planner.

Naples to Sorrento is an approximately 1.5-hour car ride. You can also ride a ferry; or take a train. Traveling from Naples in January, plan for a bit warmer nights in Sorrento, with lows around 48°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 4th (Tue) so you can go by car to Salerno.

Things to do in Sorrento

Museums · Historic Sites · Wineries · Nature

Side Trip

Find places to stay Jan 2 — 4:

Salerno

— 1 night

Unspoilt Gem of the Amalfi Coast

While often overshadowed by the Amalfi Coast's array of quaint villages, Salerno has become one of the region's main areas for culture and entertainment, while remaining relatively unmarked by tourism.
For other places to visit, reviews, and tourist information, refer to the Salerno trip itinerary website.

Traveling by car from Sorrento to Salerno takes 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or take a bus. In January, daily temperatures in Salerno can reach 56°F, while at night they dip to 48°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 5th (Wed) to allow enough time to fly to Catania.

Things to do in Salerno

Find places to stay Jan 4 — 5:

Catania

— 2 nights

Black Pearl of Ionian Sea

The landscape surrounding Catania, a medieval city on Sicily's eastern coast, is dominated by Mount Etna, the tallest active volcano in Europe.
On the 6th (Thu), step off the mainland to explore Isola Bella, then view the masterpieces at Good Fellas Art Studio, and then make a trip to Corso Umberto. On the 7th (Fri), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: hunt for treasures at A' Piscaria Mercato del Pesce and then steep yourself in history at Piazza Duomo.

For traveler tips, photos, where to stay, and more tourist information, use the Catania online visit planner.

You can fly from Salerno to Catania in 3 hours. Other options are to do a combination of car and ferry; or take a train. Expect little chillier evenings in Catania when traveling from Salerno in January, with lows around 39°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 7th (Fri) to allow enough time to drive to Palermo.

Things to do in Catania

Shopping · Nature · Outdoors · Parks

Side Trip

Find places to stay Jan 5 — 7:

Palermo

— 2 nights
The capital of Sicily, Palermo was founded by the Phoenicians under the name of Ziz.
Kick off your visit on the 8th (Sat): take in the architecture and atmosphere at Santa Maria dell'Ammiraglio, steep yourself in history at Norman Palace, and then view the masterpieces at Regional Gallery (Galleria Regionale della Sicilia). Here are some ideas for day two: browse the fresh offerings at Mercato Ballaro, then contemplate the long history of Catacombe dei Cappuccini, then don't miss a visit to Cattedrale di Palermo, and finally kick back and relax at Spiaggia di Mondello.

Take the guesswork out of planning a Palermo vacation by using our trip itinerary maker.

Traveling by car from Catania to Palermo takes 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or take a train. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 9th (Sun) early enough to fly to Naples.

Things to do in Palermo

Find places to stay Jan 7 — 9:

Naples

— 3 nights
Naples is the capital of the Italian region Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy after Rome and Milan. Start off your visit on the 10th (Mon): see the interesting displays at Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, then admire the masterpieces at Museo Cappella Sansevero, and then appreciate the extensive heritage of Underground Naples. On the next day, step into the grandiose world of Castel Nuovo - Maschio Angioino, do a tasting at Bosco de Medici Winery, and then explore the ancient world of Parco Acheologico di Ercolano.

For more things to do, maps, reviews, and tourist information, read Naples day trip website.

You can fly from Palermo to Naples in 2.5 hours. Other options are to take a bus; or take a train. Expect a daytime high around 56°F in January, and nighttime lows around 42°F. You will have some time to spend on the 12th (Wed) before leaving for home.

Things to do in Naples

Historic Sites · Museums · Wineries · Neighborhoods

Side Trips

Find places to stay Jan 9 — 12:

Amalfi Coast travel guide

4.2
Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks · Gardens
Renowned for its beautiful landscape and medieval fishing villages that cling precariously to the Mediterranean cliffs, the Amalfi Coast is one of Italy's top vacation destinations. This World Heritage Site stretches for about 50 km (30 mi) on the southern side of the Sorrentine peninsula and offers numerous places to visit, from terraced lemon gardens and whitewashed villas to cliff-top views of the sea. Explore the coastline's towns, bays, and resorts. During the peak tourist season, the Amalfi Coast's single seaside road is often jammed with dozens of buses. For that reason, the ubiquitous scooter may be the best way to get around and sightsee. You can also access quite a bit by bicycle.

Sicily travel guide

4.5
The largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, Sicily is a ruggedly attractive land. The island has a long history of foreign domination and has been controlled by the Greeks, Romans, Arabs, and Normans. The result is a distinct culture blending elements from all of those areas and featuring an intriguing dialect. This is a huge island with plenty of small villages to tour, each with its own treasures. Beyond the popular coastal areas, Sicily's inland attractions include an unspoiled landscape of mountains, hills, and villages that sometimes seem frozen in time. While the natural environment is its biggest draw, Sicily's greatest asset may be its people. They are proud of their traditions and incredibly hospitable to visitors.