The independence hall of Korea, Cheonan
(4.7/5 based on 65+ reviews on the web)
A National Heritage site measuring at 23,424 sq m (252,134 sq ft), The independence hall of Korea represents the largest museum in South Korea. Ever since its opening in 1987, it has attracted tourists and locals interested in the country’s history and development. Learn about the various movements that led to the country gaining its independence, and see exhibits spanning from prehistoric times all the way to the most recent history. Walk through the seven exhibition halls, and watch a documentary in the onsite theater. The museum offers brochures in braille, designed for visitors who have eyesight problems. Put The independence hall of Korea and other Cheonan attractions into our Cheonan travel itinerary planner, and watch your holiday take shape.
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Reviews
TripAdvisor
  • This is where our sick living, breathing history. Educational places too. And a look back at the way the in maples around Independence Hall can feel nature.
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  • If you're into history or museums, this is a very well put together display that chronicles the history of Korea throughout generations. When I went there I had no idea some of the oppression and turm...  more »
  • History of Korea from prehistoric times until its independence very well summarized through 6 museums, playful side for children with a stamp to be affixed on each pass, and interactive for adults. Models beautiful and very realistic, moving statues such as that of the liberation... For those who want to learn more about the history of the Korea, you are in the right place. In addition, the entrance is free (like most of the museums in Korea). The pay thing is the little train that takes you to the foot of the museums if you want / can not walk or if you are with small children and the memories and drinks/restore...
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