Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne, Rome

4.1
#1430 of 2,927 in Things to do in Rome
The Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne is a Renaissance palace in Rome, Italy. The palace was designed by Baldassarre Peruzzi in 1532-1536 on a site of three contiguous palaces owned by the old Roman Massimo family and built after arson destroyed the earlier structures during the Sack of Rome (1527). In addition the curved façade was dictated by foundations built upon the stands for the stadium (odeon) of the emperor Domitian. It fronts the now-busy Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, a few hundred yards from the front of the church of Sant'Andrea della Valle.The entrance is characterized by a central portico with six Doric columns, paired and single. Inside there are two courtyards, of which the first one has a portico with Doric columns as a basement for a rich loggia, which is also made of Doric columns. The column decorations gave the name to the palace, alle Colonne. The façade is renowned as one of the most masterful of its time, combining both elegance with stern rustication. The recessed entrance portico differs from typical palazzo models such as exemplified by the Florentine Palazzo Medici. In addition, there is a variation of size of windows for different levels, and the decorative frames of the windows of the third floor. Unlike the Palazzo Medici, there is no academic adherence to superimposition of orders, depending on the floor. On the opposite façade of this palace, opening onto the Piazzetta dei Massimo, the palace connects with the frescoed façade of the conjoined annex, the Palazzetto Massimi (or Palazzetto Istoriato). For many centuries, this used to be the central post office of Rome, a Massimo family perquisite. To the left of the palace is the Palazzo di Pirro, built by a pupil of Antonio da Sangallo.
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Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne Reviews
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  • Accidentally read in those that once a year on March 16 the Massimo family opens their palace to the general public. Coming up, we saw a long line. After a while they stopped entering the palace. Along the queue was one of the organizers and I asked him how much else to wait. He explained that some cardinal was coming and there would be a mass only for the family. then he took us to the exit and said goodbye and shook our hands for a long time... And the queue stood and waited...
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  • I was surprised to find the building of a different canonizing place around the building town. It's a renaissance building in the sixteenth century. Yes, newer than expected, but generally old enough. It seems to be an undisclosed dwelling usually, but there seems to be a public day.
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  • It is near Piazza Navona and is the palace of the Massimo family along the Emanuele II Avenue. The building itself is a somber look of stone, but the stone pillar of the entrance reminiscent of the Roman ruins on the first floor makes you feel the likeness of the palace. It seems that the descendants of the Massimo family live today.
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Google
  • Palazzo Massimo Alle Colonne is one of the masterpieces of Roman' Renaissance designed by Baldassarre Peruzzi in 1532. The complex blueprint of this palace is one of the main characteristics of this monument representing the genius of Peruzzi. He, in fact, found complex solutions to organize the interior space, ensuring at the same time excellent lighting conditions and an intimate living space. The front was realized using an interesting technique, previously used by Bramante, which give it the aspect of a wall of rocks (bugnato).
  • This private palazzo contains a church, declared to be one and not a chapel by papal decree in 1839. It's dedicated to St Philip Neri, and is open to the public on only one day a year -on 16 March. Allegedly the saint had a brief conversation with a dead son of the family, whose body had been laid out in this room on this date in 1583.
  • Another impressive sight in Rome.
  • Cool
  • respect! Do not confuse with the National Museum near Piazza Republica! The front at Corso Vitt. Emanuele II follows the former course of Domitian Stadium and was named after 6 narrow Doric columns in front of the front. Here, by the way, 2 Germans in the Renaissance had the first printing plant in Italy. Not accessible today.
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