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Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia, Rome

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History Museum
Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia houses some of the world's most important sculptures and artifacts from Etruscan civilization. This 16th-century palace, formerly the property of the pope, contains objects from some of Italy's oldest civilizations. Examine ancient ceramics, jewelry, and tools while learning about the history of this highly advanced pre-Roman civilization. The most famous treasure on display here is the terracotta funerary monument Sarcofago degli Sposi, depicting a married couple reclining together at a banquet. In between looking at ancient objects, you can visit the villa's peaceful grounds or restaurant. Work out when and for how long to visit Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia and other Rome attractions using our handy Rome vacation trip planner.
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TripAdvisor
  • Be sure to look out for in Rome? Etruscan Museum collection! Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia National Etruscan Museum-created at the initiative of the Italian archaeologist Felice Barnabei (1842-1922), was opened in the year 1889. The Museum is housed in the former summer residence of the popes, built in the 16th century, the outstanding architects of Giorgio Vasari (Giorgio Vasari -1511 -1574), Vin'oloj (Jacopo Barozzi da Vignola, 1507-1573) and Ammanati (1511, An Bartolomeo-1592). The museum displays objects with Etruscan IX on the II century BC, including household and artistic ceramics. Amphorae were used for storage and transportation of food, gidrijah-large jugs with three handles-kept the water in the craters of mixed wine with water and applied it to the ojnohojah. Kanfarosy, and drinking horns rhytas kiliki served bowls to drink in small alabastronah and ariballah kept the incense. Of particular interest is the collection of bukkero, which is called the national Etruscan pottery. Bukkero-ceramic black or grey colour, without varnish or paintings, polished to a shine. In 1919 year Museum collection amassed a unique collection of the family of Castellani (Castellani). It contains about 6000 bronze articles, pottery, ivory, precious metals. Etruscan bracelets, rings, pins, pendants, fibulae (clasps), decorated with ornaments and figural compositions harmoniously coexist with the jewels of the middle ages, the Renaissance and 20th century. Note the famous sarcophagus "Spouses" and "Signora", as well as terracotta statue of Apollo from the Way: it created a Volcano, the only sculptor Etruria, whose name is preserved in the history.
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  • In 800 the "Nymphaeum of Valle Giulia" was seen as "the eighth wonder of the world". After the war every year there took place the ceremony (moved to 20015) for the celebration of the prestigious premio Strega and the times I've gone I've been overwhelmed by the magic of the place. After so many years we are back in a bright sunny Sunday and the effect was even more addictive. The Villa is located in the Centre of Rome in a small valley from the foot of the monti Parioli goes so far as to the Tiber. The territory we visit today is only a third of the ancient villa from the beginning of 1900, and houses the National Museum of the Etruscan-Roman Antiquities collecting of Lazio, of Etruria and Umbria. Villa Giulia, built in 1550, is one of the most beautiful examples of Renaissance palace. Was Julius III at commissionarla at Vasari who designed it with the help of Michelangelo, newly appointed by the Pope to head of architects of the fabbrica di San Pietro, but shortly after was enlarged by Vignola and by Ammannati to whom we owe the magnificent entrance porch. Villa Giulia that Julius III had intended to country house originally consisted of 3 villas: the principal called Vigna Vecchia, the second (which no longer exists) was the name of the vineyard of the Tiber where arrived at port because the Papal landing and the third, Vigna del Monte that corresponds to the current building. Today Villa Giulia, starting with the magnificent porch to house with covered with frescoes by Ammannati, which scandalised the Puritans because it depicts putti playing with their genitals, develops through a series of courtyards, corridors and gardens that descend deeper than input. With two semicircular sweeping staircases to go down to the first floor where there are two niches with sculptures of the Tiber and Arno sculpted by Ammanati, apparently under the supervision and correction of Michelangelo, and finally the beautiful Nymph who was at the time a real theater of water from which emerge in a semicircle the caryatids, female figures that seem to support the upper floor. The water at that time by the powered aqueduct Virgin is made even more evocative by an architectural game of stone formations, water lilies, and plants in 1941 at the center of the nymphaeum mosaics were laid from finds in the via Aurelia. Julius III was a man of great culture, lover of the arts and a patron of writers and artists, he strengthened the Vatican Library and the University of Rome and gave final approval to the society of Jesus (the Jesuits). When was compounded Rheumatoid gout from which he suffered for some time and which led him shortly after his death, he decided to move to Villa Giulia and continuously invited Vatican and papal boat came up came via Tevere to private landing for enjoy the magnificence of the place, walk in the gardens and eating delicacies on the tables set up in front of the coolness of the source. Julius III is buried in Rome in the Church of San Pietro in Montorio.
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  • A true journey into the birth of the italic population: valuable relics and valuables enrich the exhibition spaces congenial. Applaud the Organization for masterminding a path full of information, well subdivided temporally and logistically. Tip: 3 hours to dedicate with passion for history, or with the curiosity to know more about our wonderful heritage. You will find utensils, amphorae, vases, plates, jewelry, external weaponry, shields, female ornaments, ... and especially you can delve into the cult of the dead and the tombs, thanks to which these remains have come down to us. If you have any comments, you can contact me, I would support you if necessary.
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Google
  • Fabulous Italian museum of Etruscan history. Not to be missed. Many historical artifacts.
  • For us who do not speak Italian this museum has limited to offer. Many of the great stands are available in English as well as Italian, but most of the information tables in the counters with artifacts are only in Italian.
  • Outstanding villa and gardens with a well organized exhibition of impressive Etruscan artworks.
  • Well worth a visit, if only for the spectacular building. The collection is interesting too, even if you don't know much about the subject matter. Beautiful and a good way to escape the mid-day heat.
  • A truly spectacular collection of Etruscan items. Given the history, most are pottery or bronze. About 2/3 of the galleries are extremely well presented and lit (especially the first wing, and the last few rooms - there are 40 in all!); the other 1/3 a little hard to see - but tend to contain lesser works. There are some real gems here. We took two visits to see everything because we actually like to look at what's displayed, rather than race through. The main downside (besides the sheer volume of material)? Several of the descriptions refer to items that are in other places.