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Acquedotto Vergine, Rome

2.7
#465 of 527 in Historic Sites in Rome
Acquedotto Vergine is located in Rome. To visit Acquedotto Vergine on your holiday in Rome, and find out what else Rome has to offer, use our Rome visit planner .
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  • This spot was the end of the famous Roman aqueduct system in the city. Amazing to think of it being so old.  more »
  • No, it's not the title of a red light movie but we're going to talk about a virgin anyway. Of some sources of pure water, at least ab origine, and so sweet and clean to taste that they became famous in Rome and that, for about 2,000 years, they quench the citizens of Rome and its guests. The springs of the Virgin water originate in a vast area near the high course of the river Aniene, placed at the eighth Roman mile of the Via Collatina and, after a route of 14,105 Roman miles and that is almost 20 and a half miles and half a dozen deviations For public and private use, it ends in the park of Pincio. The Virgin Aqueduct was set around the year 20 BC by Marco Vipsanio Agrippa, the son-in-law of Augustus, also known for having built the Pantheon. Originally, given the superb quality of the water without calcium, it had to be used for the optimum functioning of the baths of Agrippa in Campo Marzio and to supply the Imperial house and a part of Rome. The Virgin Aqueduct, devoid of limestone and other heavy metals, started from a series of sources channeled in the area called "Salone", located at about 20 km from Rome, towards the Alban Hills to the east of the city. Then Compiva, always buried in the countryside around Rome, a wide arch towards the west to reach first the Via Collatina, the areas of Campo Marzio, Portonaccio, Pietralata, underlaying the consularies Nomentana and Salaria, continue in the areas of Villa Ada, Parioli, Villa Borghese, the Pincio (where there is still and is accessible the underground duct through a spiral staircase called "the Snail of the Pincio"), Villa Medici, Via del Nazareno, Via del Corso, Piazza Sant'Ignazio, Via del Seminario and conclude Its route in the area of the Panteon where a branch continued until XIII ° Rione of Rome: Trastevere. Being, at least in its long initial part, of a series of underground ducts, the Virgin Aqueduct was largely rescued by hostile acts by the Goths of Vitige who, in the year 536, besieged Rome. The aqueduct was repeatedly restored by the emperors Augustus, Tiberius, Claudius, Domitian, Constantine I and Theodoric, and the fallen western Empire, from the Popes Adriano I, Niccolò V, Paul IV, Sixtus IV, Pius IV, Pius V, Benedict XIV and, finally, Pius VI. With the passing of the centuries, indeed, of the millennia, the pure virgin water deteriorated and, in our day, it is forbidden to use food. It continues, instead, its use for the supply of some of the wonderful monumental water exhibitions and that is for the supply of some of the most beautiful monumental fountains of Rome: The Fountain of the Barcaccia with Spanish Steps, the famous Trevi fountain in Piazza di Trevi, the Fountain of the Four rivers at Piazza Navona and the fountain of the Nicchione in Via dei Foro Imperiali. A little curiosity: the name of the aqueduct derives from the indication of its sources by a very young shepherdess untouched who pointed to the Roman engineers where the spring-like pools was found. The Virgin Aqueduct, for much of the underground route has a diameter of about one metre and a half, in large part is dug in the tuff at an average depth of about 40 meters in the suburban area and has 18 "Castella", that is points of derivation and distribution Secondary, scattered along its path. In our day, Virgin Water has been declared non-drinkable; It has been flowing to Rome for over 2000 years!
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  • I vow to the management not to the historical finding, these are the remains still visible from behind a grate of an ancient Roman aqueduct but to visit it it is necessary to book to the number indicated on the sign affixed to the grate which however is always busy
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  • The Aqua Virgo from Pincio to Fontana di Trevi (passing by the new Rinascente) The already rich archaeological heritage of the historical center of Rome has been enriched in the last months of a new extraordinary site. The renovation works of the new Rinascente building in Via del Tritone have brought to light about 4000 sqm of the old quarter that stretched between Pincio and Quirinale. Domus, Balnea, Sepulchres, roads roads (including a diverticulum of the Via Salaria Vetus) and above all 15 perfectly preserved arches of the Virgin Aqueduct. The Virgin Aqueduct (Aqua Virgo) is the only one of the eleven main aqueducts of ancient Rome that remained continuously in operation until our day, feeding the fountains of the Baroque city, including Fontana di Trevi that represents the monumental exhibition. Inaugurated in 19 B.C. by Agrippa, the son-in-law of the emperor Augustus, probably derives its name from the purity and freshness of its waters even if a suggestive legend traced it to the maiden who pointed to the place of the springs to the soldiers in charge of the search . The Aqua Virgo originated from sources located in the Agro Lucullano, at the VIII mile of the Via Collatina, in the present locality of Salone, and ended in Campo Marzio after a predominantly underground route of more than 20 kilometers, the Aqua Virgo was heading Towards the Nomentana and the Salaria, then, bending southwards, it crossed the areas of Villa Ada and Parioli, passing under the nymphaeum of Villa Giulia, and entered the town near the twisted Wall, on the Pincio. n This suggestive evening we will follow the route of the aqueduct starting from the Pincio, where at the edge of the east of Villa Medici is the access to a place particularly suggestive for its constructive characteristics: it is Of the famous "snail", a cylindrical well 25 meters deep, inside which was built a spiral staircase in masonry that allows to reach the cave of the ancient aqueduct Virgin. We will visit the archaeological multimedia area in the basement of Rinascente making you relive the adventure of a stratigraphical reading of a complex site of urban archaeology. We will also visit the remains of the aqueduct conserved in Via del Nazareno which still present the inscription of the restoration by the emperor Claudius of 46 A.D. and who will assume a new sense precisely in the light of recent discoveries.
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  • From the site of the city of Rome: The architectural remains in Via del Nazareno are the most important yet visible section of the urban route of the Virgin Aqueduct. Built at the behest of Agrippa in 19 B.C., from the source, located at the Casale di Salone at Km. 10,500 of the Via Collatina, the aqueduct entered inside the urban walls at the height of the twisted wall and ended with a monumental exhibition in the Baths of Agrippa. Today the Trevi fountain and the fountains of Piazza Navona are still powered by the same aqueduct. At the height of the present Piazza di Spagna, the aqueduct, up to that point underground, went out above and continued on elevated arches of which are visible today, in addition to the remains of Via del Nazareno, those in Via del Bufalo. The tract in Via del Nazareno is constituted by a fornice, built at the behest of Claudius in 46 B.C. at the turn of an ancient road of Regio VII: The pillars and the arch are made up of a ashlar element made of large chunks of peperino while the frame , now lost, was to be of travertine. The dedicatory inscription, which gives Claudio the construction work, is still visible today on both sides of the structure. When the emperor Hadrian restored the entire route of the aqueduct, the Arch of the Nazarene was reinforced with a masonry cladding and still, in later times, the duct was raised by more than 1 metre compared to the original plan.
    View original
  • The Aqua Virgo from Pincio to Fontana di Trevi (passing by the new Rinascente) The already rich archaeological heritage of the historical center of Rome has been enriched in the last months of a new extraordinary site. The renovation works of the new Rinascente building in Via del Tritone have brought to light about 4000 sqm of the old quarter that stretched between Pincio and Quirinale. Domus, Balnea, Sepulchres, roads roads (including a diverticulum of the Via Salaria Vetus) and above all 15 perfectly preserved arches of the Virgin Aqueduct. The Virgin Aqueduct (Aqua Virgo) is the only one of the eleven main aqueducts of ancient Rome that remained continuously in operation until our day, feeding the fountains of the Baroque city, including Fontana di Trevi that represents the monumental exhibition. Inaugurated in 19 B.C. by Agrippa, the son-in-law of the emperor Augustus, probably derives its name from the purity and freshness of its waters even if a suggestive legend traced it to the maiden who pointed to the place of the springs to the soldiers in charge of the search . The Aqua Virgo originated from sources located in the Agro Lucullano, at the VIII mile of the Via Collatina, in the present locality of Salone, and ended in Campo Marzio after a predominantly underground route of more than 20 kilometers, the Aqua Virgo was heading Towards the Nomentana and the Salaria, then, bending southwards, it crossed the areas of Villa Ada and Parioli, passing under the nymphaeum of Villa Giulia, and entered the town near the twisted Wall, on the Pincio. n This suggestive evening we will follow the route of the aqueduct starting from the Pincio, where at the edge of the east of Villa Medici is the access to a place particularly suggestive for its constructive characteristics: it is Of the famous "snail", a cylindrical well 25 meters deep, inside which was built a spiral staircase in masonry that allows to reach the cave of the ancient aqueduct Virgin. We will visit the archaeological multimedia area in the basement of Rinascente making you relive the adventure of a stratigraphical reading of a complex site of urban archaeology. We will also visit the remains of the aqueduct conserved in Via del Nazareno which still present the inscription of the restoration by the emperor Claudius of 46 A.D. and who will assume a new sense precisely in the light of recent discoveries.
    View original
  • The Virgin Aqueduct (Aqua Virgo) is the only one of the eleven major aqueducts of ancient Rome that has remained continuously in operation to this day, feeding the monumental fountains of the Baroque city, including Trevi Fountain. The Trevi Fountain, in the modern age, is its terminal exhibition. Opened in 19 BC by Agrippa, son-in-law of Emperor Augustus, it probably takes its name from the purity and freshness of its waters although an evocative legend goes back to the girl who pointed the place of the springs to the soldiers in charge of the search. The Aqua Virgo originated from springs in the Agro Lucullano, at the 8th mile of the Collatina Street, in the present location of Salon, and ended in Campo Marzio after a mainly underground route of more than 20 kilometers. Starting from an area southeast of Rome, it entered the city from the north, after carrying out a large arch. It followed the Collatina route to the town of Portonaccio, where it crossed the Tiburtina street. The aqueduct passed over the arches of the Marranella Ditch at the confluence with the Aniene. Here you can see a large stretch in elevated, 320 m long, made of tuff mesh. Then the Aqua Virgo headed towards the Nomentana and salaria then, bending south, crossed the areas of Villa Ada and the Parioli, passing under the nymph of Villa Giulia, and entered the city near the Torto Wall.   A limaria swimming pool (decanting serbation) was located at the Pincio slopes, where the ancient duct is accessible via a spectacular spiral staircase built in the Renaissance.  At two slaughterhouses the path became open-air and continued on arches. Impressive remains can be seen inside the "Renaissance" via Triton and at Via del Nazareno. Here are preserved, partially buried, three arches in stranded blocks of travertine placed on the sides of a larger furnace. Above the latter, identified with the arch erected by Claudius to celebrate his victory over the Germans, is placed the inscription reminiscent of the restoration of the Virgin Aqueduct carried out in 46 A.D. by the same emperor. It reads: Ti(berius) Claudius Drusi f(ilius)Caesar Augustus Germanicus / pontifex maxim(us) trib(unicia) potest(ate) V imp(erator) XI p(ater) p(atriae) co(n) s(ul)desig(natus) IIII /arcus ductus aquae Virginis disturbeds for C(aium) Caesarem / a fundamentis novos fecit ac restituit (Tiberius Claudius, son of Druso, Caesar Augustus Germanic, maximum pontiff, clothed for the fifth time of the tribunician power, acclaimed emperor for the eleventh time, father of the homeland, consul designated for the fourth time, he reconstructed and restored from the foundations the arches of the aqueduct of the Virgin water, damaged by Gaius Caesar (Caligula)). The incident has been linked by some to the construction of an amphitheater in the Campus Marzio promoted by Caligula and never completed. Two other travertine furnaces can be seen below Palazzo Sciarra, near Via del Corso, the ancient Via Lata, which the Aqua Virgo crossed with a large arch turned by Claudius into a triumphal arch to celebrate the conquest of Britannia. After passing St. Ignatius Square, the conduit came to seminary street where probably the terminal castellum was located, placed, as Frontino writes in his treatise on the aqueducts, in front of the front of the Saepta, the large public building located in near the Pantheon and the adjacent Agrippa Baths.
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  • From the site of the city of Rome: The architectural remains in Via del Nazareno are the most important yet visible section of the urban route of the Virgin Aqueduct. Built at the behest of Agrippa in 19 B.C., from the source, located at the Casale di Salone at Km. 10,500 of the Via Collatina, the aqueduct entered inside the urban walls at the height of the twisted wall and ended with a monumental exhibition in the Baths of Agrippa. Today the Trevi fountain and the fountains of Piazza Navona are still powered by the same aqueduct. At the height of the present Piazza di Spagna, the aqueduct, up to that point underground, went out above and continued on elevated arches of which are visible today, in addition to the remains of Via del Nazareno, those in Via del Bufalo. The tract in Via del Nazareno is constituted by a fornice, built at the behest of Claudius in 46 B.C. at the turn of an ancient road of Regio VII: The pillars and the arch are made up of a ashlar element made of large chunks of peperino while the frame , now lost, was to be of travertine. The dedicatory inscription, which gives Claudio the construction work, is still visible today on both sides of the structure. When the emperor Hadrian restored the entire route of the aqueduct, the Arch of the Nazarene was reinforced with a masonry cladding and still, in later times, the duct was raised by more than 1 metre compared to the original plan.
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