Chiesa di Santa Giulia, Padria

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  • An important example of Gothic-Aragonese architecture in Sardinia, it was consecrated and opened for worship in 1520, after a few decades of construction. On the facade there are the heraldic shields with the insignia of the De Ferrera (barons of Bonvehi) and of the Bishop of Bosa Pietro de Sena The current church was built on the same point where another medieval church stood, on whose facade the date 1170. On the same land there were the remains of another early Christian church built in 338 AD, devastated during the vandal domination. In the Archives of the Diocese of Bosa there are ancient documents relating to the church of S. Giulia, which dates back to 1341. The church is rebuilt on three cult facilities that can be traced back to the Paleochristian age, with a monumentalized and venerated Byzantine tomb with a single-ship church and medieval, with a three-nave basilica. This structural context, which is preserved under the sixteenth-century church, evidence of how intense and relevant the cult and administrative activity of Padria was, is also stratified, without caesuras, on residential and funerary contexts of the Roman age, prior to the affirmation and diffusion of Christian religion and worship. The complex articulation is visible inside the current nave and legible in a didactic apparatus. Of great suggestion are the architectural structures and the decorative apparatus of the current Gothic-Aragonese church,
  • The parish church was rebuilt around 1520, by the baron of Bonvehì Bernardino de Ferrera. The balance of proportions and the executive refinement make it one of the most important Iberian architecture in Sardinia. The facade is cuspidate, between diagonal buttresses tapered with steps and polygonal at the top, divided by a rosette frame, spherules, diamond points and amygdaloid human faces, with the date MDXX in the center, under which trilobes and inflected arches run, which revolve around the buttresses. The arches are also under the crowning (with the busts of the evangelists among animal figures), in the end wall of the nave, in the second order of the bell tower and, inside, above the chapels and in the counter-façade. A trilobo arch adorns the top of the four lateral buttresses, on which they unload the transverse arches that leave the hall in five bays and between which the lowest lateral chapels are arranged. The jambs are three pillars with single bases on a plinth that continues, with little overhang, along the entire facade. The moldings continue in the ring with diamond points and externally with a phyto-morphological frieze that forms an inflection with a double flowerhead. The particularity, lies in originating on the sides of the capital of the outermost pillar, on which a monstrous figure climbs, and in passing over the pinnacles that originate from it and continue, with crochets and fiorone, up to the arches. On the first step of the buttresses rest two Prophets. On the sides of the facade are two gargoyles: the left is anthropomorphic and the right is lion-shaped. The building has the facing in square blocks only in the facade and in the apse, in stones in the sides, highlighted by a recent restoration that has restored the ancient cocciopisto cover on the extrados of the vaults. The bell tower, with a spire and a square barrel, is coeval with the church in the first two orders (in the second, from the side of the facade you can see the shape of a typically Catalan mullioned window with arches surmounted by a point median, later in the remaining two, with late sixteenth century ornaments that betray the early Renaissance influences. The nave is divided into five bays, cross-vaulted, with pointed arches on pilasters. Of the current nine lateral chapels with pointed arches, up to the first half of the nineteenth century only seven were mentioned, in addition to the one with the baptismal font, both in the reports of pastoral visits and by V. Angius (1846), and this confirms the impression that the first on the right, like the second and third, was added in the later period. The different chronological scan of the chapels is also confirmed by the characteristics of the pillars: similar to those of the apse and beam arch or with a central column the closest to the apse (fourth and fifth spans), polygonal or rectangular in the first spans, which were built last. The apsidal chapel, lower and narrower than the nave, is pentagonal, with external buttresses at the corners, decorated with gargoyles with animal figures, and a radial cross vault with seven segments and a gem carved with S. Giulia on the cross flanked by two angels. The triumphal arch a the acute sixth is supported by polystyle pilasters with a bundle of columns, with original capitals alternating naked shield-holding angels and phytomorphic ornaments. The iteration of the symbols of the Cross and of Christ appears insisted: in the gem of the first span there is St. Constantine on horseback with the banner, which corresponds, in the last, to S. Giulia with the cross and palm of martyrdom. The IHS symbol is in the shields held by similar angels in the capitals of the fourth right chapel while the reference to the two mendicant Orders is given by the effigy of St. Francis and by that of St. Dominic in the gems of the first and fourth left chapel. (Sardinia Culture)
  • An important example of Gothic-Aragonese architecture in Sardinia, it was consecrated and opened for worship in 1520, after a few decades of construction. On the facade there are the heraldic shields with the insignia of the De Ferrera (barons of Bonvehi) and of the Bishop of Bosa Pietro de Sena. The current church was built on the same spot where another medieval church stood, on whose facade the date of 1170 was marked. On the same ground there were the remains of another early Christian church built in 338 AD, devastated during the vandal domination . In the Archives of the Diocese of Bosa there are ancient documents relating to the church of S. Giulia, which dates back to 1341. The church is rebuilt on three cult facilities that can be traced back to the Paleochristian age, with a monumentalized and venerated Byzantine tomb with a single ship church and medieval, with a three-nave basilica. This structural context, which is preserved under the sixteenth-century church, evidence of how intense and relevant the cult and administrative activity of Padria was, is also stratified, without caesuras, on residential and funerary contexts of the Roman age, prior to the affirmation and diffusion of Christian religion and worship; the ancient structures are currently visible through a glass paved floor
  • Beautiful church! In this church a long time ago I was an altar boy
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