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Senate Palace, Milan

(4.4/5 based on 15+ reviews on the web)
Senate Palace is located in Milan. Work out when and for how long to visit Senate Palace and other Milan attractions using our handy Milan vacation builder.
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Reviews
TripAdvisor
  • The concave façade intrigues as well as intrigues the inscription which stands above the arched Portal "Palazzo del Senato" (who knows what does?!). The Panel placed in the square (where it makes a fine show also a work by Miro, Mother Ubu), next to the entrance, where we talk about State archives, dismisses the normal tourist, I don't imagine you can enter: is a public office! But if it takes courage and you enter, you can visit a beautiful building (not in the best condition of conservation), with an interesting structure: two successive short two-storey arcades (or lodges with architraves) on both floors, a solution, almost unique in the panorama of the palaces of Milan, which at the time of construction was much appreciated; and you can wander freely through the courtyards and upstairs access along a wide staircase. The Palace has a complicated history, as many buildings in Milan; I have put my hand – at different times – several designers/architects, with the task of adapting them to the different uses. I tried to summarize, after consulting several sources, for use by the visitor who doesn't have much time to study it, but it's long and it takes a while – however – patience to read the whole thing! The Palace was constructed – on the banks of the Naviglio now covered, on land belonging to private homes or monasteries humiliati and – starting from Milan, 1608 by Cardinal Federico Borromeo, who wanted it to be the seat of Swiss boarding school, which had been founded in 1579 by the Archbishop of Milan Carlo Borromeo as a seminary for the formation of the clergy involved in the churches of the Diocese of Milan situated in the territories of the Swiss cantons to counter the spread of the Protestant Reformation. A plaque, inside, reminiscent of the original destination of the building. Next to the College was built the Church of s. Carlo al College: is still visible, externally, though little recognizable, on the left, when facing the entrance, because in 1776 Leopold Pollack the integrated into the façade. The project for the construction of the building was assigned initially to the foreman and the engineer-architect Aurelio Trezzi Plow Caesar; by 1613 the works were entrusted to Fabio Mangone, master builder of the Cathedral of Milan, which defined the architectural aspects related to both backyards: a portico with Doric columns surmounted by a loggia with ionic columns both trabeati) above the columns there are blocks/horizontal slabs) and covered barrel, which differed markedly from all other public and private courtyards , of Milan, built with columns and arches or columns and serlianas. And are the yards, which have retained their appearance, the most beautiful in the Palace. In 1632 interjected Francesco Maria Richini who designed the façade we see today, a concave façade: with this idea he wanted to solve the difficult problem of alignment of the façade (compared to the Naviglio or courtyards?) The façade was decorated with triangular Gables on the first floor and curved Windows per second; the Center was an arched portal between pillars topped by a balcony; the curved part was divided from the aisles by sturdy protruding stones (the ashlars of strain); all the outlines of floors and openings were clearly marked. In 1664 the factory of the College expanded further by purchasing, the neighboring monastery of San Primo with the Church. In construction management took over – between 1713 and 1721 – first the architect Gerolamo Quadrio and, later, his son, architect Giovanni Battista Quadrio, who intervened in the Church, perhaps in the decoration of the staircase and built the porch between the two courts and one at the bottom to the second courtyard. After the 1776 the architect Leopoldo Pollack, new head of the factory of the College, completed the arcades along the via san Primo and built the Church, Deconsecrated, into the building (today it is the seat of the Conference room). After the closure of the Swiss boarding school and transfer of clerics at the Seminary of the rectory in 1786 (decreed by Joseph II of Austria), the building had various uses. From 1786 to 1796 was the seat of the Government Council of Milan, and underwent changes according to the plans of the architects Giuseppe Piermarini and Marcelino Segrè. In the twenty years the Palace was the seat of the Grand Council first Napoleonic of Juniors of the Cisalpine Republic (1797-1802); then the war Department of the Italian Republic (1802-1808); Finally, the Senate of the Kingdom of Italy (1809-1814), from which it took its name by which it is still best known. It was partially amended: Luigi Canonica adapted temporarily for meetings ground-floor room, but the other renovation projects he elaborated were never started. During the subsequent period of the restoration the building was home to the Imperial Command and the Austrian Chancellery (1814-1816) and later became the Palace of accounting (1816-1859), undergoing further changes. After the unit was asserting its cultural features and study destination: first it was the seat of the Accademia scientifico-letteraria in Milan (1862-1863); later, starting in 1865, began the paperwork for conversion into offices of the State Archives of Milan. Then, after about fifteen years, sharing with other institutions from the State archive in 1886 Milan became the stable and exclusive Institute hosted in the Palace of the Senate; that same year he concluded the work transfer, during which were gradually transported on site almost all archives deposited in different forums. Since then they have created jobs for its adaptation to the new use. Following the second world war and the devastating bombings of 1943 which hurt badly the Palace, both in wall structure both in terms of documentation, were accomplished major renovation and reconstruction of destroyed building parts: you saved the façade and courtyards, while has been completely redone, with a curtain characterized by high Windows the left side (the one on via Marina). Since the 1950s, then were made functional and plant adjustment works of the entire structure in relation to the evolution of storage systems, technologies and systems, which have not changed but the historical structure of the building. Today this Palace with its curious and very serious can be visited, without special procedures during normal office opening hours (from Monday to Thursday: 8:00-17:45, Friday, 8:00-14:45; Saturday: 8:00-13:45). It is possible to visit its beautiful paved courtyards and original – with pebbles, typically from Lombardy, and its open galleries: it is certainly not in perfect condition, but it is certainly very interesting. It's accessible, upon request, also the great documentary heritage: we speak of about 45 linear kilometres of shelving! In addition, from February 28, 2017, thanks to an agreement signed by the State Archives and Italian Touring Club, you will be able to visit, on Saturday morning, the permanent collection held at the Lecture Hall of the ground floor, which is made up of 11 reproductions of documents of great importance, including the oldest parchment Italian Government archives, dated 1 May 12, 72!.
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  • This impressive Palace you will immediately notice the beautiful façade, which is due to the architect Richini, that drew the curve because you don't you notice that wasn't exactly parallel to the naviglio (today via Senato) which would have thwarted the canons of beauty of the era
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  • The Palace of the Senate of Milan, Fabio Mangone was built in 1620. during the Napoleonic period, for host the Swiss school. Nowadays the Palace houses the State archives.
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  • The Senate building is a historic building in Milan, in via Senate 10, now home of the State archives.
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  • This palace is the home of the Archive of the State. It was built in the 17TH century by Federico Borromeo. Nice place to visit.
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  • The only flaw the scarce presence of catering services!
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  • A piece of history of our beautiful city
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  • Beautiful location
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