Alai Minar, New Delhi

3.8
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4.4
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  • It take the pose I was directed to come to say take a picture Uncle uniformed officials, such as security guards., finally requested chip. Terrible should be India.
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  • Alai Minar was to be a giant Tower, but construction was abandoned. The unfinished tower is located in the complex of the Qutub Minar. Is open daily.
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  • The next win is going to be larger than the top side on their completion does not work. If you look closely at the top in any way you can tell that you have created.
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  • At times, it is heart touching to watch the relics of an unfulfilled dream. Standing still here, a huge one storied minaret which could not rise as much as it was meant to be, is chanting the Psalms of lost lustre... years of moulding the protocol in mind... The pain in delivering every single stone in its posture... The pace in which fantasy shot up to the sky while the fact below decelerated... Alas, the deep sorrow that's only leftover... Alain minar- the unfinished dream.
  • The Alai Minar is a massive structure which was started by Aladdin Khilji in 1311 AD. Sultan Aladdin Khilji, an over ambitious Sultan of the Khilji dynasty, wanted to build a structure that would be double the height of Qutub Minar to commemorate his victory over one of his Deccan campaigns. He also executed the plan and increased the size of the enclosures of the Quwwat-Ul-Islam Masjid by four times its original size to provide a ceremonial entrance gateway on either sides of the mosque.
  • The Alai Minar is an unfinished tower in the Qutub Complex, construction of which was started by Alauddin Khilji. After Khilji had doubled the size of the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque he decided to constructed a tower which would be twice the height of the Qutub Minar. Construction of the Alai Minar came to a halt in 1316 following the death of Alauddin Khilji. Today the Alai Minar, a massive red rubble structure stands at a height of 2.5 meters. The Alai Minar is an incomplete monument that lies within the Qutb complex in South Delhi. Sultan Ala-ud-Din Khalji was an over ambitious Sultan of the Khilji dynasty and won many wars and battles. After a win from one of his Deccan campaigns, the Sultan dreamt of constructing a huge Tower or Minar to commemorate his victory.
  • The site of the mosque was originally a Sanskrit college building commissioned by Vigraharaja IV (alias Visaladeva), a king of the Shakambhari Chahamana (Chauhan) dynasty. The original building was square-shaped, with a tower-chhatri (dome-shaped pavilion) at each corner.[5][6] A temple dedicated to Sarasvati was located on the western side. A tablet dated to 1153 CE was found at the site in the 19th century; based on this, it can be inferred that the original building must have been constructed sometime before 1153 CE.[3] According to the local Jain tradition, the building was originally constructed by Seth Viramdeva Kala in 660 CE as a Jain shrine to celebrate Panch Kalyanaka.[3] The relics in the modern building show both Hindu and Jain features. According to KDL Khan, the building materials were taken from Hindu and Jain temples.[1] According to Caterina Mercone Maxwell and Marijke Rijsberman, the Sanskrit college was a Jain institution, and the building materials were taken from Hindu temples.[7] ASI Director-General Alexander Cunningham hypothesized that the pillars used in the building were probably taken from 20–30 demolished Hindu temples, which featured at least 700 pillars in total. Based on the pillar inscriptions, he concluded that these original temples dated to 11th or 12th century CE.[8] Conversion into a mosque The original building was partially destroyed and converted into a mosque by Qutb-ud-Din-Aibak of Delhi in the late 12th century. According to a local legend, after defeating Vigraharaja's nephew Prithviraja III in the Second Battle of Tarain, Muhammad Ghori passed through Ajmer. There, he saw the magnificent temples, and ordered his slave general Qutb-ud-Din-Aibak to destroy them, and construct a mosque – all within 60 hours (that is, ​2 1⁄2 days). The artisans could not build a complete mosque in 60 hours time, but constructed a brick screen wall where Ghori could offer prayers. By the end of the century, a complete mosque was built.[1] The central mihrab in the mosque contains an inscription indicating the completion date of the mosque. It is dated Jumada II 595 AH (April 1199 CE). This makes the mosque one of the oldest in India, and the second mosque to be built by the Mamluks of Delhi (the first being the Quwwat-ul-Islam mosque). Another inscription, dated Dhu al-Hijjah 596 AH (September–October 1200 CE), names Abu Bakr ibn Ahmed Khalu Al-Hirawi as the supervisor of construction.[9] This makes Adhai Din Ka Jhonpra one of the oldest mosques in India,[10] and the oldest surviving monument in Ajmer.[11] Iltutmish, the successor of Qutb-ud-Din-Aibak, subsequently beautified the mosque in 1213 CE, with a screen wall pierced by corbelled engrailed arches — a first in India.[2] An inscription on the central arch of the screen as well as two inscriptions of the northern minaret contain his name. The second arch from the south names one Ahmed ibn Muhammad al-Arid as the construction supervisor.[9] Archaeological survey and restoration The mosque seems to have been ignored by the later kings. It does not find a mention in Taj-ul-Maasir, the earliest history of the Mamluk dynasty. It is not mentioned in Khalji, Lodi, Rathore, Sisodia and Mughal chronicles either. The Maratha leader Daulat Rao Sindhia (1779–1827) restored the central dome of the building, and imposed a ban of removal of stones from the structure. An inscription dated Saavan 1866 VS (1809 CE) exhorts Hindus and Muslims not to remove stones from the ancient building.[3] In 1818, Ajmer came under the Company rule. James Tod visited the mosque in 1819, and described it in his Annals and Antiquities of Rajastʼhan as "one of the most perfect as well as the most ancient monuments of Hindu architecture." Subsequently, Alexander Cunningham,
  • The Alai Minar is an unfinished tower in the Qutub Complex, construction of which was started by Alauddin Khilji. After Khilji had doubled the size of the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque he decided to constructed a tower which would be twice the height of the Qutub Minar. Construction of the Alai Minar came to a halt in 1316 following the death of Alauddin Khilji. Today the Alai Minar, a massive red rubble structure stands at a height of 2.5 meters. Very well preserved structures and worth a visit while in Delhi. We had tried to see this the day prior but the crowds were overwhelming for our kids so we returned earlier the following morning and it was a lot quieter.

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