Trip Planner:   Europe  /  Denmark  /  Zealand  /  Copenhagen  /  Sightseeing  /  Christiansborg Palace
Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen
(4.4/5 based on 2,400+ reviews on the web)
The seat of the country's parliament, the stately Christiansborg Palace stands directly above the ruins of a castle that existed in this very spot nearly 1,000 years ago. Take a guided tour of the palace to see its famous royal reception rooms used by the queen to entertain visiting heads of state. Be sure to visit the largest of the reception rooms, a hall so vast it can seat up to 400 guests. For a crash course in Danish history, visit the remains of the original castle to learn about the palace's long service as a royal residence and seat of legislative power. Check the website for downloadable maps of the palace. Arrange your visit to Christiansborg Palace and discover more family-friendly attractions in Copenhagen using our Copenhagen itinerary planner.
Create a full Copenhagen itinerary
map

Plan your trip to Copenhagen

  • Get a personalized plan

    A complete day-by-day itinerary
    based on your preferences
  • Customize it

    Refine your plan. We'll find the
    best routes and schedules
  • Book it

    Choose from the best hotels
    and activities. Up to 50% off
  • Manage it

    Everything in one place.
    Everyone on the same page.

Plans in Copenhagen by other users

10 days in Scandinavia BY A USER FROM UNITED STATES April, culture, historic sites, museums, shopping, popular PREFERENCES: April, culture, historic sites, museums, shopping ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 16 days in Scandinavia BY A USER FROM UNITED STATES March, popular PREFERENCES: March ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 18 days in Europe BY A USER FROM UNITED STATES June, teens, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: June, teens ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 19 days in Europe BY A USER FROM UNITED STATES June, teens, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: June, teens ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 11 days in Copenhagen, Oslo & Stockholm BY A USER FROM UNITED STATES July, teens, popular PREFERENCES: July, teens ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 14 days in Europe BY A USER FROM UNITED STATES July, popular PREFERENCES: July ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 9 days in Scandinavia BY A USER FROM AUSTRALIA September, outdoors, romantic, museums, shopping, popular & hidden gems PREFERENCES: September, outdoors, romantic, museums, shopping ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular & hidden gems PACE: Medium 44 days in Europe BY A USER FROM AUSTRALIA November, historic sites, hidden gems PREFERENCES: November, historic sites ATTRACTION STYLE: Hidden gems PACE: Medium 4 days in Copenhagen BY A USER FROM AUSTRALIA May, kids, culture, outdoors, historic sites, museums, shopping, popular PREFERENCES: May, kids, culture, outdoors, historic sites, museums, shopping ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 16 days in Scandinavia BY A USER FROM UNITED STATES March, popular PREFERENCES: March ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 38 days in Europe BY A USER FROM NEW ZEALAND August, popular PREFERENCES: August ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium 1 day in Copenhagen BY A USER FROM NORWAY January, popular PREFERENCES: January ATTRACTION STYLE: Popular PACE: Medium
View more plans
Reviews
TripAdvisor
  • Externally is a very beautiful with a nice Gallop in front but once inside it's nothing. The kitchens are cute, reconstructed with original tools give you an idea of the size of Royal dinners. While the Palace itself is not worth much so many empty rooms more or less decorated. Not worth paying to get in, but if you have the Copenhagen card then a quick jump you can do
    View original
  • What an amazing visit we had. Very interesting when you take the guided tour, which give you a complete insight into the running plus everyday life at the Palace. Highly recommended! 
  • The Palace is impressive from all angles. Located in the Center. The Interior is not open to the public year-round.
    View original
Google
  • Splendid palace and very nice free English tour through the rooms at 3pm (after you buy the ticket to visit the rooms). The tower with view is free but the queue can take quite long (because they only have 1 elevator and there's no other option). Normally the tower visit is open till 9pm, only one day it's close at 5pm (on Monday if I remember correctly)
  • Not open on Mondays. Despite opening hours on Google maps suggesting that it does. Have edited. Disappointed. Monday is a rubbish day in Copenhagen.
  • The tower offers excellent view of the city. They only allow 40 people so arrive early. They open between 10 am and 9pm so you can catch the sunset up there too. Try the restaurant's signature open sandwich.
  • Probably one of the biggest highlight of my stay in Copenhagen. I am glad we went here and took the tour. It's worth the price. Expect to spend around 3 hours doing all the tours. Just a beautiful and magnificent place.
  • Christiansborg Palace (Danish: Christiansborg Slot; pronounced [kʰʁesd̥jænsˈb̥ɔːɐ̯ˀ ˈslʌd̥]) is a palace and government building on the islet of Slotsholmen in central Copenhagen, Denmark. It is the seat of the Danish Parliament (Folketinget), the Danish Prime Minister's Office and the Supreme Court of Denmark. Also, several parts of the palace are used by the Danish monarch, including the Royal Reception Rooms, the Palace Chapel and the Royal Stables. The palace is thus home to the three supreme powers: the executive power, the legislative power, and the judicial power. It is the only building in the world that houses all three of a country's branches of government. The name Christiansborg is thus also frequently used as a metonym for the Danish political system, and colloquially it is often referred to as Rigsborgen (English: castle of the realm) or simply Borgen (English: the castle). The present building, the third with this name, is the last in a series of successive castles and palaces constructed on the same site since the erection of the first castle in 1167. Since the early fifteenth century, the various buildings have served as the base of the central administration; until 1794 as the principal residence of the Danish kings and after 1849 as the seat of parliament. The palace today bears witness to three eras of Danish architecture, as the result of two serious fires. The first fire occurred in 1794 and the second in 1884. The main part of the current palace, finished in 1928, is in the historicist Neo-baroque style. The chapel dates to 1826 and is in a neoclassical style. The showgrounds were built 1738-46, in a baroque style. Christiansborg Palace is owned by the Danish state, and is run by the Palaces and Properties Agency. Several parts of the palace are open to the public