Trip Planner:   Canada  /  Ontario  /  Elora  /  Wildlife Areas  /  Elora Gorge Conservation Area
Elora Gorge Conservation Area, Elora
(3.5/5 based on 240+ reviews on the web)
Discover the Canadian wilderness across 145 hectares (360 ac) of raw nature at Elora Gorge Conservation Area. At the nature reserve, find an abundance of campsites, hiking trails, and swimming areas, or engage in a range of activites, such as swimming, kayaking, and tubing. Head to the Grand River, the nature park’s main attraction. Dip your feet into the cold water of the river, which flows through the bottom of the gorge for approximately 2 km (1.2 mi), or head to the Elora Quarry Conservation Area. There, find an old swimming hole surrounded by cliffs up to 12 m (39 ft) tall. Put Elora Gorge Conservation Area and other Elora attractions into our Elora trip itinerary builder, and watch your holiday take shape.
Create a full Elora itinerary
map

Plan your trip to Elora

  • Get a personalized plan

    A complete day-by-day itinerary
    based on your preferences
  • Customize it

    Refine your plan. We'll find the
    best routes and schedules
  • Book it

    Choose from the best hotels
    and activities. Up to 50% off
  • Manage it

    Everything in one place.
    Everyone on the same page.
Reviews
TripAdvisor
  • City super small, but with a very beautiful architecture and worth knowing. The river and the natural pool are full, but nothing get in the way of the visit. Recommend.
    View original
  • This has something for everyone. Beautiful views of the gorge, wonderful old forests, decent trails for walking. Currently, there is a bit of construction going on around the Elora Mill site right now...  more »
  • Spent the day in Elora which is on the Grand River. The Elora Gorge is dramatic and beautiful. The colours were outstanding. 
Google
  • I've only done the trail here and it's well worth the visit. Pleasant walk, not too difficult of a hike. The scenery is really nice.
  • Very disturbed at the cavalier and careless way the tubing is handled. First, my sister and I weren't asked our weight regarding the life jackets. There were no signs or verbal instruction from any staff member indicating that the first waterfall and set of rapids is a common area for serious injuries (2 people had broken their ankles just the week before we were there - according to the park ranger) and so should be skipped by those not wanting to risk being hurt. There wasn't anyone down at the river to assist in case of emergency, and I was in dire need of assistance with no way out but to get back on the tube with what I thought was a broken ankle and hip. I was very frightened and in a lot of pain. And I'm a strong person ... I'm muscular, I'm a strong swimmer, I do lots of thrill-seeking activities. I got thrown off the tube at that first waterfall, got separated from my tube, got pinned under the waterfall for a bit because my lifejacket couldn't support me, when I finally clawed my way to the surface I was shot forward like out of a cannon directly into boulders and rocks while still fighting to keep my head above water, I tried helplessly to get to the side or plant my feet to stop. This went on for a while until my tube finally and thankfully caught up to me. I could at least put it in front of me to take the impact of the rocks, and I could catch my breathe. I was finally able to come to a stop at the end of the rapids, but I wasn't able to walk because my hip had been knocked out of joint and was pinching a nerve. I had to go through the rest of the river, in agony with every little bump of a rock, and had to go through more rapids and another small waterfall. This was not a fun day!! The park ranger told me that people are regularly getting hurt on the river, but the serious injuries happen at the first waterfall/set of rapids. She also said that she's requested many times over the years that the park close that section to the tubers. Yet not once before this ride were we told this so that we could make that decision ourselves. We had no idea of the dangers of this experience because of the cavalier way they handle the rentals. I can't imagine what would have happened if I wasn't a strong person. A full month later, and I've finally just recovered from my tubing experience after weeks of treatments by chiropractor, acupuncture, massage & physical therapy costing me close to $1000.
  • I remember hurting myself really badly while tubing so I managed to stop at the edge and I was going with my family but they went down the whole way so I walked back to the rental area with really scratched and bleeding knees and they gave me a towel to clean up the blood and directed me to where the end of the tubing was and I reunited with my fam.
  • The campsite is rather small. This in result creates a very little gap between campers. This can be a issue, in my case, resulting in expulsion from the camp. You see, during my very short time at the camp, we simply propped up our tent and had dinner. In the very nature of camping, noise is bound to be produced. Of course we did not simply create noise simply for the fun of it, rather it was creating noise out of giving out orders and instructions. According to our neighbor though, this was simply too much for her to handle. So she went to the main entrance, wept and complained about our noise. Wept? How can an individual simply cry about noise? Anyways, the park ranger was going to give us a warning that night, but was too lazy/tired and decided not to give us a warning. The very next day, due to the ranger's discretion, the ranger kicked us out from the site. The funny part was that when we asked about a warning, he hesitated but regardless kicked us out. Says a lot about elora gorge's staff.
  • As a couple of Chinese young adults, I feel very discriminated by the staff working at Elora Gorge Conservation Area; we were kicked off the campsite based on the "feelings" of one older, white woman (which was the only camper with any complaint) WITHOUT ANY WARNINGS. Even the staff at the front desk said there was supposed to be a warning for any violations except for alcohol possession/consumption, but the park rangers said that "the policies state that they can kick out campers at the rangers' discretion". I don't understand how this is fair in any way towards us, and we feel that we were wrongfully penalized because of our Asian descent and younger age.